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The Nautilus Network

Overthrowing the Patriarchy Through Ecstatic Sex

A Surprising Side of Carl Sagan

Print Edition 43

Print Edition 42

Print Edition 41

Print Edition 40

Moving Beyond Mimicry in Artificial Intelligence

Land of Extremes: Poetry of the Sonoran Desert

Automatic for the Oceans

Under Anesthesia, Where Do Our Minds Go?

How Are the Bees?

Feeling Stressed? Read a Poem

How Do We Get People Who Believe in Pseudoscience to Trust Science?

What Oceanographers Can Learn From Their Animal Colleagues

Don’t Give Up on Facts

Are You a Naïve Realist?

This Planetary Scientist Is Always Reaching for Something Big

Thinking Like a Scientist Will Make You Happier

Test

The Giraffe Neck Evolved for Sexual Combat

Reshuffled Rivers Bolster the Amazon’s Hyper-Biodiversity

Who Are the Scientists Here?

Gravitational Waves Continue to Astound

The Secrets of the Blind Salamander

Mysteries Are to Be Embraced, But Also to Be Solved

Unlocking Mom’s Brain

The Race to Explore the Ocean’s Twilight Zone

Were It Not for Cosmic Good Fortune, We Wouldn’t Be Here

Portrait of the Human as a Young Hominin

Life’s First Peptides May Have Grown on RNA Strands

You Eat a Credit Card’s Worth of Plastic Every Week

The Oceans Are Teeming with Unknown Species

No Two Human Brains Are Alike

What Is Time?

Doctor Strange and the Multiverse in Science

How Much Is the Ocean Worth?

We Were Here

A Voice for Minorities in Aquaculture

We Better Think Twice About What We Say to ET

“I Have to Admit, I Have a Very Low Opinion of Human Beings”

He Fast-Forwarded Evolution into the Future

What Lurks in a Drowned Forest in Alabama?

A Viral Twitter Thread Reawakens the Dark History of Anthropology

The Return of New York Harbor’s Oysters

What Regret Tells Us

Researchers Gain New Understanding From Simple AI

As Creation Stories Go, the Big Bang Is a Good One

The Machiavellians of the Animal Kingdom

Cancer Shouldn’t Pose a Threat to Our Lives. We Should Find It First

Animals Feel What’s Right and Wrong, Too